Cite as: ‘Anarchival Practices’, book presentation presented at the workshop Worlding Art History through Syllabi, ICI Berlin, 10 October 2022, video recording, mp4, 39:56 <https://doi.org/10.25620/e221010-1>
Book Presentation
10 Oct 2022

Anarchival Practices

Launch of the publication series ‘Worlding Public Cultures: The Arts and Social Innovation’, featuring Carine Zaayman (author of the premiering WPC book, Anarchival Practices: The Clanwilliam Arts Project as Re-imagining Custodianship of the Past, WPC / ICI Berlin Press 2022) in conversation with Wesley C. Hogan

In this chapbook, Carine Zaayman instantiates the Anarchive as a means to reimagine how custodianship of the past is practiced. The Anarchive constellates archives and the absences that attend them in a manner that both centralizes the vastness of absence, and leaves it unreconstructed. The chapbook articulates the implications of the Anarchival constellation for scholarship and artistic practices that draw on archival material. Her argument is founded on an engagement with colonial archives that hold strands of Southern African pasts, and demonstrate its implications by examining the Clanwilliam Arts Project. Through an analysis of this case study, she argues that the Anarchive facilitates a privileging of decolonial forms of custodianship of the past that can lead to communal, co-designed and embodied forms of historical narration.


Venue

ICI Berlin
(Click for further documentation)

With

Wesley C. Hogan
Carine Zaayman

Organized by

Ming Tiampo
Birgit Hopferer
The Heidelberg University team of Worlding Public Cultures: The Arts and Social Innovation in collaboration with Ming Tiampo (WPC / Carleton University) and Birgit Hopfener (WPC / Carleton University), in cooperation with ICI Berlin.

WPC is funded by a Social Innovation Grant from the Trans-Atlantic Platform for the Social Sciences and Humanities and (within Germany) by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF/DLR, no. 01UG2026).


Video in English

Format: mp4
Length: 00:39:56
First published on: https://www.ici-berlin.org/events/anarchival-practices/
Rights: © ICI Berlin

Part of the Workshop

Worlding Art History through Syllabi

The recent ‘global turn’ in art history and curatorial practice has prompted the question of how to reflect this through pedagogy. The workshop Worlding Art History through Syllabi takes up the notion of ‘worlding’ to explore how art history is taught in different places and institutions around the world. What would a ‘worlded’ syllabus look like, and how can we collaboratively ‘world’ global art history?

A ‘worlded’ art history rejects the idea of a single global world framed, ordered and represented according to Eurocentric premises or as universally constituted by global capitalism. Instead, it conceives of the global as constituted from multiple and entangled geo-cultural perspectives. It is not centered on assumed commonalities of ‘global’ art. Rather, it seeks to shed light on differences and relations. What are histories, epistemologies, and ontologies that constitute ‘global’ art? What are infrastructural or institutional incommensurabilities which define the many intersecting art histories of the present?

This workshop invites scholars from the fields of art history, cultural studies, cultural anthropology, media studies, museum studies and other related disciplines to participate in an peer-to-peer exchange of experiences and practices. It focuses on how scholars may, or already have, designed teaching syllabi to complicate dominant frameworks of ‘global’ art history. It is particularly interested in how syllabi have the capacity to restructure pedagogical approaches to teaching topics such as global capitalism in the art world, the so-called Global North-South division, transnational and transcultural entanglements, and differences between teaching regional art histories.

 

Venue

ICI Berlin
(Click for further documentation)

With

Oliver Aas
Eva Bentcheva
Laurens Dhaenens
Pauline Dourtreligne
Eva Ehninger
Claire Farago
Wesley Hogan
Birgit Hopfener
Monica Juneja
Franziska Kaun
Seunghee Kim
Franziska Koch
Anton Lee
Mark Louie Lugue
Priya Maholay
Shatavisha Mustafi
Roger Nelson
Varda Nisar
Miriam Oesterreich
Luísa Santos
Vera Simone-Schulz
Moritz Schwörer
Xiaoxia Song
Ming Tiampo
Carine Zaayman
Ayelet Zohar
Esra Yildiz

Organized by

Ming Tiampo
Birgit Hopfener
The Heidelberg University team of Worlding Public Cultures: The Arts and Social Innovation in collaboration with Ming Tiampo (WPC / Carleton University) and Birgit Hopfener (WPC / Carleton University), in cooperation with ICI Berlin.

WPC is funded by a Social Innovation Grant from the Trans-Atlantic Platform for the Social Sciences and Humanities and (within Germany) by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF/DLR, no. 01UG2026).