Book Section
While literature on intersectionality proliferates, mention of anarchafeminism, which is a feminist tradition that focuses on the intersectional nature of female oppression, is scarce to say the least. This feminist strand of anarchism has largely been neglected both within feminism and the left. I argue that anarchafeminism is a particularly timely form of feminism because it is able to articulate a feminism free of essentialism. Furthermore, I argue that an ontology of the transindividual is the best possible philosophical ally for this project.
Keywords: feminism; anarchism; materialism; transindividuality; ontology; coloniality of gender; state power; Spinoza, Baruch
Title
Anarchafeminism & the Ontology of the Transindividual
Author(s)
Chiara Bottici
Identifier
DOI Target
HTML Page
Description
While literature on intersectionality proliferates, mention of anarchafeminism, which is a feminist tradition that focuses on the intersectional nature of female oppression, is scarce to say the least. This feminist strand of anarchism has largely been neglected both within feminism and the left. I argue that anarchafeminism is a particularly timely form of feminism because it is able to articulate a feminism free of essentialism. Furthermore, I argue that an ontology of the transindividual is the best possible philosophical ally for this project.
Is Part Of
Place
Berlin
Publisher
ICI Berlin Press
Date
2021
Subject
feminism
anarchism
materialism
transindividuality
ontology
coloniality of gender
state power
Spinoza, Baruch
Rights
© by the author(s)
Except for images or otherwise noted, this publication is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Language
en-GB
short title
Anarchafeminism
page start
215
page end
231
Source
Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 215–31
Bibliographic Citation
Chiara Bottici, ‘Anarchafeminism & the Ontology of the Transindividual’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 215–31 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_12>

References

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  • Balibar, Étienne, Spinoza and Politics (London: Verso, 1998)
  • Balibar, Étienne, ‘Philosophies of the Transindividual: Spinoza, Marx, Freud’, trans. by Mark G. E. Kelly, Australasian Philosophical Review, 2.1 (2018), pp. 5–25 <https://doi.org/10.1080/24740500.2018.1514958>
  • Balibar, Étienne, and Vittorio Morfino, Il transindividuale: soggetti, relazioni, mutazioni (Milano: Mimesis, 2014)
  • Bottici, Chiara, Imaginal Politics: Images Beyond Imagination and the Imaginary (New York: Columbia University Press, 2014) <https://doi.org/10.7312/columbia/9780231157780.001.0001>
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  • Gatens, Moira, and Genevieve Lloyd, Collective Imaginings: Spinoza, Past and Present (London: Routledge, 1999)
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  • Lugones, Maria, ‘The Coloniality of Gender’, in The Palgrave Handbook of Gender and Development: Critical Engagements in Feminist Theory and Practice, ed. by Wendy Harcourt (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), pp. 13–33 <https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-137-38273-3_2>
  • Malatesta, Errico, L’Anarchia [1891] (Rome: Datanews, 2001)
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  • Negri, Antonio, The Savage Anomaly: The Power of Spinoza’s Metaphysic and Politics (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1991)
  • Oyěwùmí, Oyèrónk ẹ́ , The Invention of Women: Making an African Sense of Western Gender Discourses (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997)
  • Read, Jason, The Politics of Transindividuality (Leiden: Brill, 2015) <https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004305151>
  • Simondon, Gilbert, L’Individuation psychique et collective (Paris: Aubier, 1989)
  • Spinoza, Benedictus de, The Collected Works of Spinoza, ed. and trans. by Edwin Curley, 2 vols (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1985–2016)
  • Voss, Daniela, ‘Disparate Politics: Balibar and Simondon’, Australasian Philosophical Review, 2.1 (2018), pp. 47–53 <https://doi.org/10.1080/24740500.2018.1514966>
  • Williams, Caroline, ‘Thinking the Political in the Wake of Spinoza: Power, Affect and Imagination in the Ethics’, Contemporary Political Theory, 6 (2006), pp. 349–69 <https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.cpt.9300298>
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Cite as: Chiara Bottici, ‘Anarchafeminism & the Ontology of the Transindividual’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 215–31 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_12>
Chiara Bottici, ‘Anarchafeminism & the Ontology of the Transindividual’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 215-31 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_12>

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