Book Section
Christoph F. E. Holzhey

Emergence that Matters and Emergent Irrelevance

On the Political Use of Fundamental Physics
With reference to the mobilization of physics in new feminist materialisms, this chapter argues that the fundamental ontology of matter suggested by physics is of no political relevance. Instead, its position is that devising effective strategies to deactivate the normative power of fundamental ontologies remains politically relevant despite long-standing critiques of essentialism. The chapter proposes that physics can be helpful both for understanding its own irrelevance and for inspiring strategies of deactivation.
Keywords: new feminist materialisms; ontological turn; normativity; emergence; scale; thermodynamics; physics; matter; performativity (philosophy); Barad, Karen
Title
Emergence that Matters and Emergent Irrelevance
Subtitle
On the Political Use of Fundamental Physics
Author(s)
Christoph F. E. Holzhey
Identifier
DOI Target
HTML Page
Description
With reference to the mobilization of physics in new feminist materialisms, this chapter argues that the fundamental ontology of matter suggested by physics is of no political relevance. Instead, its position is that devising effective strategies to deactivate the normative power of fundamental ontologies remains politically relevant despite long-standing critiques of essentialism. The chapter proposes that physics can be helpful both for understanding its own irrelevance and for inspiring strategies of deactivation.
Is Part Of
Place
Berlin
Publisher
ICI Berlin Press
Date
2021
Subject
new feminist materialisms
ontological turn
normativity
emergence
scale
thermodynamics
physics
matter
performativity (philosophy)
Barad, Karen
Rights
© by the author(s)
Except for images or otherwise noted, this publication is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Language
en-GB
short title
Emergence that Matters
page start
253
page end
268
Source
Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 253–68
Bibliographic Citation
Christoph F. E. Holzhey, ‘Emergence that Matters and Emergent Irrelevance: On the Political Use of Fundamental Physics’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 253–68 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_14>

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Cite as: Christoph F. E. Holzhey, ‘Emergence that Matters and Emergent Irrelevance: On the Political Use of Fundamental Physics’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 253–68 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_14>
Christoph F. E. Holzhey, ‘Emergence that Matters and Emergent Irrelevance: On the Political Use of Fundamental Physics’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 253-68 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_14>

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