Book Section
This chapter addresses the use of ethnographic methods in critical social theory, and the assumption that such methods prove to be useful because they allow the researcher to be closer to ‘matter itself’. Instead, I argue for ethnography from within a framework of historical materialism and social critique, marking the difference between such ‘materialism without matter’, based on Marx’s ‘fetishism of the commodity’, and some strategies of New Materialism. My goal is to situate the uses of ethnography for a transformed consideration of the relation between theory and practice.
Keywords: ethnography; historical materialism; critical theory; new materialism
Title
Theory’s Method?
Subtitle
Ethnography and Critical Theory
Author(s)
Marianna Poyares
Identifier
DOI Target
HTML Page
Description
This chapter addresses the use of ethnographic methods in critical social theory, and the assumption that such methods prove to be useful because they allow the researcher to be closer to ‘matter itself’. Instead, I argue for ethnography from within a framework of historical materialism and social critique, marking the difference between such ‘materialism without matter’, based on Marx’s ‘fetishism of the commodity’, and some strategies of New Materialism. My goal is to situate the uses of ethnography for a transformed consideration of the relation between theory and practice.
Is Part Of
Place
Berlin
Publisher
ICI Berlin Press
Date
2021
Subject
ethnography
historical materialism
critical theory
new materialism
Rights
© by the author(s)
Except for images or otherwise noted, this publication is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Language
en-GB
short title
Theory’s Method
page start
345
page end
363
Source
Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 345–63
Bibliographic Citation
Marianna Poyares, ‘Theory’s Method?: Ethnography and Critical Theory’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 345–63 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_19>

References

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Cite as: Marianna Poyares, ‘Theory’s Method?: Ethnography and Critical Theory’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 345–63 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_19>
Marianna Poyares, ‘Theory’s Method?: Ethnography and Critical Theory’, in Materialism and Politics, ed. by Bernardo Bianchi, Emilie Filion-Donato, Marlon Miguel, and Ayşe Yuva, Cultural Inquiry, 20 (Berlin: ICI Berlin Press, 2021), pp. 345-63 <https://doi.org/10.37050/ci-20_19>

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